There’s Simply No Excuse.

We’ve all seen them, those inspirational pictures and stories of people who have endured great odds to become successful. People with disabilities, but still managed to overcome and win a sport or defy expectations. These are often (ok, pretty much always) followed up with the phrase “What’s your excuse?” and I’m here to say, “Who are you to ask?”.

Some people may find motivation in that medium, but most of the disabled community find it demeaning. Think about it. Unless you’re looking in a mirror, you have NO idea what that person goes through every single day. There are some amazing people out there with disabilities, that do incredible things with the hand that has been dealt them, but to judge others lives based on what how those people live is not doing anyone justice. Here are a few examples.

Morgan Freeman has Fibromyalgia. Many people do not know this, but it’s true. He has said that after a car accident, tendons in his arm were so badly damaged that he could barely move and the Fibromyalgia developed as a result. So, how can he still work and make insanely incredible movies when other people with the same condition complain about even working? Because no two people are the same! He has different symptoms and I know for a fact he uses his pain in his performance. He also smokes a lot of medical weed, he has made that very clear in interviews. It’s his main medication and it works.

Rick Allen (the drummer from Def Leppard, you know… he’s only got one arm). Seriously, I cannot tell you how many times I have heard this one come up! “Well, if Rick Allen can do it, I bet you can too.” Yeah, well I am not Rick Allen. He’s a unbelievable talent and how he does is frankly beyond me, but saying that anybody can do anything just because someone can drum with one arm, is not motivating.

Paralympians. I have SO much respect for all the athletes at the Olympics! I cannot even imagine all the hard work that goes in to getting there. Especially for those competing in the Paralympics. Each and every one has obviously endured some amazing journey to get where they are, and there’s no doubt in my mind that most of them deal with pain on a daily basis (as do many of the athletes in the Olympics as well). That being said, each and every one of those Olympians/Paralympians are unique! Their conditions are constantly monitored by doctors and specialists. To suggest that another’s pain is less valid because someone with the same condition can win a gold medal, is degrading and disrespectful.

Elderly individuals that stay fit. I love to see senior citizens doing yoga, jogging, and lifting weights. I think we all do. It means they’ve either taken good care of themselves throughout their whole life, or they’re doing everything they can to add years onto their life now. This one means a lot to me. As many of my readers know, I recently lost my Grandmother. It was a difficult loss because we were at odds for many years and only recently became close. I miss her dearly and would give anything to see her up and running or doing yoga. I just cannot stand the images I see that say “85 years old… what’s your excuse?” and have an older gentleman with bulging muscles. Well, I’m 39 and I am now using my Grandma’s old walker. This is not a choice we make. I am not sitting around, eating bonbons, and just feeling sorry for myself. If I could do what these amazing people are doing, I would (maybe not the bulging muscles).

There are plenty of other examples I could add here, but honestly I will just get overly riled up and that won’t benefit anyone. This is an emotional topic for those of us with invisible illness, because we deal with a constant barrage of “motivational” images on a daily basis (especially on social media). We’re going to see it a lot more during the Paralympics, so I wanted to get this out there and make sure people really understood the true damage they cause. Now, there is no excuse for posting it.

 

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